Author Topic: 1000TC oil pan  (Read 3363 times)

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Offline ChrisD

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1000TC oil pan
« on: March 13, 2008, 06:03:02 PM »
I recently got a 1000TC split oil pan for my new engine project. I noticed that it is missing the gasket in the place it splits. Can I find one new or I just make a custom one out of gasket paper?
I also noticed that on the left side it has 2 round flat spaces. That is to bolt the exaust on the pan like we do on the stock 600 pan, or it is there to install sensors or oil lines?

Chris
Fiat 600 Abarth

Offline Pantdino

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Re: 1000TC oil pan
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2008, 05:30:21 AM »
I have a one piece sump and there is an oil temperature sensor in the passenger's (right) side.
I believe some oiling systems end with a direct flow into the sump also.

I don't think I've ever seen the exhaust system hung from an alloy sump-- it would be too prone to fracturing.

Jim

Offline viotti600

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Re: 1000TC oil pan
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2008, 09:46:45 AM »
 On the 850TC one-piece alloy oil pan, there were 3 round mounting bosses on the exhaust side of the pan. Looking directly at the left (exhaust) side of the oil pan, the upper right mounting boss (located just about below the fuel pump) was used to connect the muffler mounting bracket. The center/bottom mounting boss was usually used for fitting an oil temp sensor. I've never seen anything "officially" used in the upper left mounting boss (closest to the flywheel).

 On the 1000TC two-piece alloy oil pan, I've seen the same set-up as mentioned above, though some pans have only 2 mounting bosses instead of 3. In this case, the upper left mounting boss was often used as a primary (or secondary) muffler-bracket mounting point, especially with some of the period megaphone-style exhaust systems.

 Some of the 750-type alloy oil pans had 2 mounting bosses on the exhaust side, similar to on the 850TC pan, but without the third center/bottom mounting boss. There were various aftermarket exhausts that featured 2 side bracket mounting points, similar to those used on the standard Fiat 600D exhaust.

-JS.
Jeff Stich
Norco, CA, USA

Offline viotti600

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Re: 1000TC oil pan
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2008, 09:54:10 AM »

I don't think I've ever seen the exhaust system hung from an alloy sump-- it would be too prone to fracturing.

 You might want to check out a few REAL Abarth 750/850/1000 cars that have the original Abarth engines & exhausts systems in place. Most featured a sturdy metal bracket connecting the muffler to the side of the alloy oil pan. You'll find those oil pans are quite robust! ;)

-JS.
Jeff Stich
Norco, CA, USA

Offline ChrisD

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Re: 1000TC oil pan
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2008, 10:11:12 AM »
There is a flat space to drill on the right side to install a sensor. I have installed me sensor where the stock one is using a T piece. My main concirn is the exaust though. I can't let it hanging from the manifold only. Can anybody post any pics of a similar setup with the exaust mounted in the aloy pan?
Fiat 600 Abarth

Offline naegeli

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Re: 1000TC oil pan
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2008, 02:28:58 PM »
this is from a 850 TC ...

Offline naegeli

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Re: 1000TC oil pan
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2008, 02:33:24 PM »
another one with a not original exhaust i guess....
but not replica

Offline naegeli

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Re: 1000TC oil pan
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2008, 04:41:24 PM »
and here comes one from my car....122 block replica exhaust hanging on the collettore without fixing on the oilpan.

Offline naegeli

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Re: 1000TC oil pan
« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2008, 04:42:41 PM »
oops, here it is.

Offline Pantdino

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Re: 1000TC oil pan
« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2008, 05:53:15 AM »
My car (a replica) has steel supports that bolt to the engine block and extend down to mount the exhaust.

There have been so many different types of sumps made by so many different manufacturers over the years that I don't think you can assume anything.

Ultimately you'll have to look at how thick the metal is around where you plan to put the load of the exhaust and judge for yourself if it will take it.

I assumed from ChrisD's initial description that he was describing areas that were flat but the same thickness as the surrounding metal. If there is a thick area I would be more confident that it would work without failing.

JIm

Offline ChrisD

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Re: 1000TC oil pan
« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2008, 08:14:38 AM »
This is the left (driver side) of the pan. You can see the flat place that I measured to be 20mm thick and by placing my stock exaust there the distance is correct. All it needs is drilling. Has anyone mounted the exaust like that or we all have it hanging from the exaust manifold only?

Jim,

That way of bolting the exaust to the block reminds me of the Fiat 850 installation....thought of that too but it might be better on the pan after all.
Fiat 600 Abarth

Offline Paul vander Heyden

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Re: 1000TC oil pan
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2008, 03:12:25 PM »
Chris,

On my own car the holes on the lower part of the sump were used to mount a support bracket for the exhaust system.  If you plan on using them this way, then I suggest that you put "helicoils" in the holes that you plan to use for this purpose, so that you are not threading directly into the aluminium.

An additional note of caution.  As the exhaust system heats up it actually grows in length.  If you make the bracket a solid connection to the exhaust system and the oil pan, then you WILL eventually crack the bracket.  I know, as I have been there before. I would suggest a bracket that is a "cradle" that goes around the exhaust tube/muffler with two small tabs on either side.  Then take a small coil spring and stretch it over the top of the exhaust tube/muffler, from tab to tab.  This will support and secure the muffler, but still allow it to move slightly as the overall length of the exhaust system grows with increase in temperature.

The lowest one can be used as a location for the oil temperature sender. 

Regards,
Paul Vanderheijden
Scuderia Topolino